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Two-Week Non-Credit Courses

The Emory Pre-College Program offers a diverse selection of two-week non-credit courses in a variety of disciplines. Students will experience college-level academics in a small class setting with some of Emory's leading experts in their respective fields and will receive written feedback on their work at the end of the course. Pre-College students will also receive a grade of Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory and a certificate of completion at the conclusion of the program.

All non-credit courses meet from 9:00-11:30am daily and may have additional requirements (excursions, film viewings, etc.) in the afternoons or evenings. In addition to their coursework, each Pre-College student will participate in College 101 sessions which are held in the afternoons (read more here). Students may only register for one Pre-College course per two-week session, but we do welcome students to enroll in multiple courses in consecutive sessions.

Session A: June 21 – July 3, 2015

Session B: July 5 – July 18, 2015

Session C: July 19 – August 1, 2015

[Below are courses that were offered Summer 2014. Courses for 2015 will be available in December.]

Session A

  • The Neuroscience of Brain Enhancement (Session A) - FULL

  • June 29 - July 12, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Michael Crutcher
  • Examine the science of brain and cognitive enhancement techniques while exploring both the history of these techniques and predictions for future technologies in this very popular course.

  • Infectious Diseases: Causes and Cures (Session A)

  • June 29 - July 12, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Michael Mina
  • This course will introduce highly motivated students to the exciting world of infectious disease outbreaks that are responsible for the deaths of millions of children and adults every year throughout the far reaches of our Earth.

  • Globalization

  • June 29 - July 12, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Frank Lechner
  • This sociology course discusses the rapidly-expanding ways people are becoming more closely connected across the world - from the economy to entertainment, from sports to philanthropy.

  • Psychology of Creativity

  • June 29 - July 12, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Marshall Duke
  • Why are certain people so creative? Is it genetic, or a result of childhood experience? Are they different from everyone else? This popular psychology course highlights the different theories of creativity.

  • Economics: Principles and Current Issues

  • June 29 - July 12, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Gordon Streeb
  • Taught by the former U.S. Ambassador to Zambia (who also served as Director of the Carter Center's Global Development Initiative), this course introduces the key principles of economics and applies them to current issues in the American and global economies.

  • Current Concepts in Sports Medicine

  • June 29 - July 12, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Joan Reed
  • Sports Medicine encompasses a range of professions which work together in the areas of prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of sports injuries. This course gives students interested in those various fields an opportunity to learn and apply the foundations needed for a future in health care for athletes.

  • Pre-Med Studies: The Anatomy of Movement (Session A) - FULL

  • June 29 - July 12, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Thomas Abelew
  • This pre-med course is taught by School of Medicine Associate Professor of Cell Biology Thomas Abelew; it focuses on the skeletal, muscular and neural structures that allow us to perform various movements.

  • Psychology of Love

  • June 29 - July 12, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • David Edwards
  • Feelings of love are among the most powerfully felt and motivating in human experience. In this seminar, we focus on romantic and companionate love as they are thought about and studied by social scientists as well as reflected in literature and film.

  • Religion and Politics in America

  • June 29 - July 12, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Gary Laderman
  • Violence, hatred, and oppression; sexuality and gender; immigration, urbanization, and diversity; missions and empire building; solitary reflections and social experimentation; entertainment and consumer culture - religion and politics in the United States is as much about these topics as it is about the institution of the presidency, or the separation between church and state, or the differences between red states and blue states.

  • Writing for College Success (Session A)

  • June 29 - July 12, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Amy Elkins
  • In this course, students will learn practical and effective strategies for writing across the disciplines.

Session B

  • Psychology and Current Fiction

  • July 13 - July 26, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Marshall Duke
  • This seminar uses basic principles of psychology to analyze the characters and plots of popular current fiction.

  • The Neuroscience of Brain Enhancement (Session B)

  • July 13 - July 26, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Michael Crutcher
  • Examine the science of brain and cognitive enhancement techniques while exploring both the history of these techniques and predictions for future technologies in this very popular course.

  • Law and Litigation

  • July 13 - July 26, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Aaron Kirk
  • Taught by Emory Law School faculty, this course introduces students to law as a profession and to some of the most fundamental legal concepts and skills.

  • Infectious Diseases: Causes and Cures (Session B) - FULL

  • July 13 - July 26, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Michael Mina
  • This course will introduce highly motivated students to the exciting world of infectious disease outbreaks that are responsible for the deaths of millions of children and adults every year throughout the far reaches of our Earth.

  • Experimental Economics

  • July 13 - July 26, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Kelli Lanier
  • Economists often rely on mathematical theories to understand how markets work. But how accurate are these theories? Do people behave as we think they do?

  • Pre-Med Studies: The Anatomy of Movement (Session B) - FULL

  • July 13 - July 26, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Thomas Abelew
  • This pre-med course is taught by School of Medicine Associate Professor of Cell Biology Thomas Abelew; it focuses on the skeletal, muscular and neural structures that allow us to perform various movements.

  • Writing for College Success (Session B)

  • July 13 - July 26, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Amy Elkins
  • In this course, students will learn practical and effective strategies for writing across the disciplines.

Session C

  • Writing the Personal Essay

  • July 27 - August 9, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • William Gruber
  • Personal narrative writing is a skill set particularly vital to creating great college-entrance essays.

  • Abnormal Psychology

  • July 27 - August 9, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Steve Nowicki
  • This course looks at atypical and abnormal psychological behavior from two unique perspectives: its impact on others, and how it feels to be affected.

  • Animal Behavior

  • July 27 - August 9, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Harold Gouzoules
  • This course introduces the key principles and areas of scientific study in the field of animal behavior. Specific topics include how animals move about their environments, how genes and environment influence behavior, how and when animals use aggression, their courtship and mating strategies, parental care, how animals find food, predator-prey interactions, and how animals communicate.

  • Cancer: The Biology Behind the Disease

  • July 27 - August 9, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Scott Wilkinson
  • In this biology class, students will work together both in highly interactive small group sessions and in directed, hands-on learning environments to gain a better understanding of the cellular and molecular underpinnings of cancer.

  • Case Studies in Neuroscience - FULL

  • July 27 - August 9, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Leah Roesch
  • Using student-centered, active-learning methods and real-world examples, this course is designed to provide a fuller understanding of how the brain works and how neuronal activity underlies human complex behaviors.

  • Evolutionary Biology

  • July 27 - August 9, 2014
  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. M-F
  • Jacobus de Roode
  • Taught by a professor recently named as one of the US's "Brilliant 10" scientists in Popular Science magazine, this course studies the evidence for evolution through a combination of lectures, and excursions to Zoo Atlanta and the Atlanta Botanical Gardens.